Targeting Mitochondria 2020 will be a Virtual and In-Person Congress

 

We have been closely following updates and evolving guidance from local, national and global agencies for COVID-19. There is still much uncertainty around the coronavirus, and how long our communities may be impacted by the pandemic, but it seems certain that decisions about how we work, travel and gather together will continue to be influenced for weeks and months still to come. Today, we have made the decision to combine the In-Person and Virtual conference.

 

If you cannot attend in-person or virtual due to the restriction and time zone difference, you can access on-demand videos to this entire event, including synced audio/video and slides.

All posters will be in PDF format. You can visit them, upload and interact directly with the poster presenter. You can also exchange with speakers via direct or private exchange during the conference.

 

We will keep you informed of any new decision.

Brain Mitochondria, Aging and Parkinson’s Disease

This paper reconsiders the role of mitochondria in aging and in Parkinson's Disease (PD). The most important risk factor for PD is aging. Alterations in mitochondrial activity are typical of aging. Mitochondrial aging is characterized by decreased oxidative phosphorylation, proteasome activity decrease, altered autophagy, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Beyond declined oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial dysfunction consists of a decline of beta-oxidation as well as of the Krebs cycle. Not inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are acquired over time and parallel the decrease in oxidative phosphorylation. Many of these mitochondrial alterations are also found in the PD brain specifically in the substantia nigra (SN). mtDNA deletions and development of respiratory chain deficiency in SN neurons of aged individuals as well as of individuals with PD converge towards a shared pathway, which leads to neuronal dysfunction and death. Finally, several nuclear genes that are mutated in hereditary PD are usually implicated in mitochondrial functioning to a various extent and their mutation may cause mitochondrial impairment. In conclusion, a tight link exists between mitochondria, aging, and PD.

News source: www.mdpi.com
Authors: Mario Rango and Nereo Bresolin