Avian red blood cell mitochondria produce more heat in winter than in autumn

Targeting Mitochondria 2021 Andreas NordThe Scientific Committee of Targeting Mitochondria 2021 Congress is honoured to invite Dr. Andreas Nord, researcher in evolutionary ecology at Lund University, Sweden, will present his study on Avian red blood cell mitochondria produce more heat in winter than in autumn.

Dr. Nord highlighted: "in winter, the mitochondria seem to prioritize producing more heat instead of more energy. The blood becomes a type of radiator that they can turn up when it gets colder".

Please follow this link to read detailed news on his research.

Targeting Mitochondria 2021 Congress
October 27-29, 2021
Berlin, Germany & Virtual Congress
www.targeting-mitochondria.com

Glucose Metabolism Control of T Cell Immunity

Targeting Mitochondria 2021 Ming Li V1The Scientific Committee of Targeting Mitochondria 2021 congress is honoured to announce the participation of Prof. Ming Li, from Immunology Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, USA

During the congress, Prof. Li will give a presentation entitled "Glucose Metabolism Control of T Cell Immunity".

Prof. Ming Li is Member of the Immunology Program at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Professor at Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences.  His laboratory studies immune regulation and its relevance to diseases including cancer.  Recent work has focused on the signaling, metabolic, and transcriptional mechanisms of T cell regulation as well as tumor-elicited innate and adaptive immune responses, and how this knowledge can be translated for novel cancer immunotherapies.  Dr. Li has received a number of honors including a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Faculty Scholar Award, a Rita Allen Foundation Scholar Award, an American Cancer Society Scholar award and the 2016 American Association of Immunologists (AAI)-BD Bioscience Investigator Award for outstanding contributions to the field of immunology.

Targeting Mitochondria 2021 Congress
October 27-29, 2021
Berlin, Germany & Virtual Congress
www.targeting-mitochondria.com

Exercise-induced, mitochondrial-mediated cell death in Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy

Targeting Mitochondria 2021 Stephen-P. ChelkoDr. Stephen Chelko from Department of Biomedical Sciences, Florida State University, USA will join the Targeting Mitochondria 2021 Congress which will be held on October 27-29, 2021 and will give a presentation on his recent  work in Science Translational Medicine on the Exercise-induced, mitochondrial-mediated cell death in Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy.

Summary of talk: Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy (ACM) is a familial heart disease with a high incidence of sudden cardiac death in the young and in athletes. Reduced penetrance and variable expressivity complicate early diagnosis and management of ACM. More and more evidence on the deleterious impact of exercise in ACM is growing, yet these studies all implicate the arrhythmic risk and/or hemodynamic load on the heart in response to exercise. New evidence demonstrates that endurance exercise leads to mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS generation, and large-scale myocyte death in ACM.

 

Targeting Mitochondria 2021 Congress
October 27-29, 2021
Berlin, Germany & Virtual Congress
www.targeting-mitochondria.com

Mitochondrial arginase-2 is essentialfor IL-10 metabolic reprogrammingof inflammatory macrophages

targeting mitochondria 2021 Dr. Claire McCoyDr. Claire McCoy from Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Ireland will join the Targeting Mitochondria 2021 Congress and give a presentation about Mitochondrial arginase-2 is essentialfor IL-10 metabolic reprogrammingof inflammatory macrophages.

Dr. Claire McCoy graduated in Biochemistry from Trinity College Dublin and completed her PhD at the University of Dundee, Scotland in 2006. Her first postdoctoral position in Innate Immunology was completed at Trinity College Dublin, during which time she was awarded a prestigious Marie Curie International Fellowship. She joined the Hudson Institute, Melbourne as a Research Fellow in 2010 and obtained a New Investigator Project Grant from the NHMRC to continue her work investigating the role of microRNAs in Inflammatory diseases. Claire joined RCSI as the Immunology lecturer in August 2016, where she now leads the growing microRNA Inflammation research group. Claire was the recipient of an SFI Future Research Leader's award presented by President Higgins in January 2018.

Targeting Mitochondria 2021 Congress
October 27-29, 2021
Berlin, Germany & Virtual Congress
www.targeting-mitochondria.com

One in Five Brain Cancers Fueled by Overactive Mitochondria

gettyimages-531927841 braincancer

A new study(link is external and opens in a new window) has found that up to 20% of glioblastomas—an aggressive brain cancer—are fueled by overactive mitochondria and may be treatable with drugs currently in clinical trials.

Mitochondria are responsible for creating the energy that fuels all cells. Though they are usually less efficient at producing energy in cancer, tumor cells in this newly identified type of glioblastoma rely on the extra energy provided by overactive mitochondria to survive.

The study, by cancer scientists at Columbia University’s Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons and Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, was published online Jan. 11 in Nature Cancer(link is external and opens in a new window).

The study also found that drugs that inhibit mitochondria—including a currently available drug and an experimental compound that are being tested in clinical trials—had a powerful anti-tumor effect on human brain cancer cells with overactive mitochondria. (Follow-up, unpublished work found that the same drugs are also active against mitochondrial tumors in glioblastomas growing in mice).

Such drugs are being tested in patients who have a rare gene fusion—previously discovered by the same researchers—that also sends mitochondria into overdrive.

“We can now expand these clinical trials to a much larger group of patients, because we can identify patients with mitochondria-driven tumors, regardless of the underlying genetics,” says Antonio Iavarone, MD, professor of neurology, who led the study with Anna Lasorella, MD, professor of pediatrics. Both are members of Columbia’s Institute for Cancer Genetics(link is external and opens in a new window).

Read more here: https://www.cuimc.columbia.edu/news/one-five-brain-cancers-fueled-overactive-mitochondria

Mitochondrial DNA in cancer: The overlooked oncogenome

Targeting Mitochondria 2021 Payam Gammage

Dr. Payam A. Gammage from CRUK Beatson Institute, United Kingdom will join the Targeting Mitochondria 2021 congress and will present a talk entitled Mitochondrial DNA in cancer: the overlooked oncogenome  during the congress.

Summary of talk: Mutations of mtDNA have been detected in human cancers for some decades, although their impact on the disease has not been clear and any potential role of mitochondrial genetics in cancer has been broadly overlooked. To better understand the role of mtDNA in cancer we repurposed targeted clinical sequencing data to assemble the largest dataset of partially matched tumour-normal mtDNA sequences to date (>40,000 tumours). Using this resource we have defined the pan cancer landscape of mtDNA mutations, demonstrating clear evidence of respiratory complex-specific mutational recurrence and selection alongside the impact of mtDNA mutations on patient survival

Key Publications

Gorelick AN, Kim M, Chatila WK, La K, Hakimi AA, Berger MF, Taylor BS, Gammage PA, Reznik E. Respiratory complex and tissue lineage drive recurrent mutations in tumour mtDNA. Nat Metab. 2021 Apr 8. doi: 10.1038/s42255-021-00378-8

Jackson CB, Turnbull DM, Minczuk M, Gammage PA. Therapeutic Manipulation of mtDNA Heteroplasmy: A Shifting Perspective. Trends in Molecular Medicine. 2020; 26: 698-709

Gammage PA, Frezza C. Mitochondrial DNA: the overlooked oncogenome? BMC Biology. 2019;17:53.

 

Targeting Mitochondria 2021 Congress
October 27-29, 2021
Berlin, Germany & Virtual Congress
www.targeting-mitochondria.com

Patient-Specific Brain Organoids for modeling Mitochondrial Diseases

Targeting mitochondria 2021 Alessandro Prigione

We are honored to announce the participation of Prof. Alessandro Prigione from, Heinrich Heine University (HHU), Germany, at Targeting Mitochondria 2021 congress.

Prof. Prigione will talk about "Patient-Specific Brain Organoids for modeling Mitochondrial Diseases" during the congress which will be held on October 27-29, 2021 in Berlin & Online.

Summary of talk: Mitochondrial diseases suffer from a lack of effective animal and cellular models. This hampers our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the neuronal pathology characteristics of mitochondrial diseases. We used patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and genome engineering with CRISPR/Cas9 to develop a human model of Leigh syndrome, which is the most severe mitochondrial disease in children and is currently incurable. Using neuronal cell cultures and three-dimensional brain organoids, we discovered previously unknown mechanisms causing the disease-specific neuronal defects, and identified two potential counteracting strategies for this rare mitochondrial disease with highly unmet medical need.

For more information about the article: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-021-22117-z

Targeting Mitochondria 2021 Congress
October 27-29, 2021
Berlin, Germany & Virtual Congress
www.targeting-mitochondria.com

A Mitochondria-targeted Caffeic Acid Derivative Reverts Cellular and Mitochondrial Defects in Human Skin Fibroblasts from Male Sporadic Parkinson’s Disease Patients

targeting mitochondria 2021 Dr.Paulo J. OliveiraDr. Paulo J. Oliveira from University of Coimbra, Portugal will join the Targeting Mitochondria 2021 congress and will present a talk entitled A Mitochondria-targeted Caffeic Acid Derivative Reverts Cellular and Mitochondrial Defects in Human Skin Fibroblasts from Male Sporadic Parkinson’s Disease Patients".

Dr. Oliveira highlighted: "We are developing a lead mitochondria-targeted hydroxycinnamic acid derivative with potential use in different diseases with a mitochondrial dysfunction component.  This talk will focus on our recent study investigating the effects of our novel molecule on skin fibroblasts from sporadic Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients. Our data shows a positive impact of this molecule on mitochondrial function and redox signaling, paving the way to further in vivo studies to validate this molecule in a PD model".

Targeting Mitochondria 2021 Congress
October 27-29, 2021
Berlin, Germany & Virtual Congress
www.targeting-mitochondria.com

Welcome to Targeting Mitochondria 2021

On behalf of the Scientific Committee of the World Mitochondria Society (WMS) I am excited to announce the 12th Conference on Targeting Mitochondria for October 27-29, 2021. We have confidence that by this time the pandemic will be under control and easy traveling will again be possible, therefore we are hoping to see you all in person in Berlin at a venue still to be announced.  

On this occasion I would like to state frankly that the success of our virtual congress exceeded my expectations. From the numerous feedbacks we have received I can conclude that COVID19 was unable to diminish our enthusiasm for the cell organelle we all revere so much. Even more, the special online format we chose seemed to have provided some unexpected benefits. For example, there was no Session Chair who had to enforce any schedule, which allowed for more extensive discussion sections as appreciated by many of us. Further, the availability of all conference contributions for an extended period of time was certainly also a very valuable feature of our 11th conference. Nevertheless, one of the most important aspects of any scientific meeting was missing, which is the personal interaction with colleagues from around the world, be it in the lecture hall, or during the coffee break or last but not least during our conference dinner. Therefore we all are very much looking forward to the next, the 12th edition of our conference series.

Independent on its format, any conference can only be as good as its speakers and its organizers. Knowing that the Organizing Committee under Prof. Marvin Edeas’ leadership will again excel in setting up the next conference, and knowing that the Scientific Committee will again invite key players in the field of Mitochondrial Medicine I assure anyone who is going to join us in Berlin in October 2021 that you won’t be disappointed, excellent venue, again excellent speakers and again an excellent organization!

While we have just started working on the outline of our next conference edition, I believe that the overarching themes of our 12th World Congress on Targeting Mitochondria will not significantly deviate from topics discussed at preceding editions of our conference series. Again, we will focus on three major areas, which are first the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in etiology and pathogenesis of chronic diseases including aging, second how to assess and above all quantify mitochondrial dysfunction in vitro and in vivo and finally, third, how to target and manipulate mitochondrial function in order to develop future mitochondria-based therapies. However, we will also try to further extend the profile and scope of our conference by inviting researchers who have never participated in our meeting before, established and new investigators alike.

Basic scientists working at the bench in the laboratory, physicians treating patients suffering from mitochondrial disorders as well as representatives of companies working on the commercialization of mitochondria-targeted therapies are all welcome to our conference. We strongly believe that our 12th World Congress on Targeting Mitochondria will be at least as exciting and as successful as our virtual 11th conference. Please feel free to contact us at any time for further information and with questions you might have.

All our warmest regards.

Targeting Mitochondria 2021-Volkmar-Weissig    

Prof. Volkmar Weissig
President of the World Mitochondria Society
Midwestern University, USA

Online Workshop - How to Evaluate Mitochondria Function ?

How-to-Evaluate-Mitochondria-Function v1

The aim of this workshop is to discuss the last advances in mitochondria assessment and evaluation. The workshop will be interactive and will be recorded.
if you wish to have a short talk during the workshop, please contact us.

Workshop-Agenda

Neurodegeneration and Mitochondria

Mitochondria-Speakers-Ming-Guo

Prof. Ming Guo from UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, USA will join the Targeting Mitochondria 2020 Congress which will be held in Berlin, Germany on October 29-30, 2020 and present her research during the talk entitled "Neurodegeneration and Mitochondria".

Summary of the Talk: Mitochondrial dysfunction has emerged as a common shared mechanism across multiple neurodegenerative disorders. This includes Parkinson’s disease, myopathy/frontotemporal dementia and ALS. The talk will discuss the latest research regarding these areas. 

 Targeting Mitochondria 2020 Congress
October 29-30, 2020 - Virtual Congress
www.mitochondria-site.com

Mitochondria Devices: New Methods to Detect Mitochondria Dysfunction

https://targeting-mitochondria.com/images/2020/speakers/Mitochondria-Speakers-Naig-Gueguen-v3.jpgDr. Naïg Gueguen from  MitoVasc Institute, Angers University Hospital Center, France will give a presentation entitled "Mitochondria Devices: New Methods to Detect Mitochondria Dysfunction" during the Targeting Mitochondria 2020 Congress which will be organized virtually, on October 29-30, 2020.

Summary of the presentation: Alterations in bioenergetics metabolism represent a common clue in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including metabolic disorders, neurodegenerative disease, inflammatory conditions and cancer. Progress toward deciphering the precise role of the mitochondria in disease etiology requires tools and methods that can dissect the complex interplay between multiple enzymes and oxidative pathways that act cooperatively to regenerate ATP and sustain cellular biosynthesis needs. Recent developments in respirometry, coupled to fluorometry/luminescence, allow multiplexing measurements and provide now routine analyses of a variety of processes, including metabolic rewiring, substrate supply pathways, the activities of the different respiratory chain complexes, ATP synthesis or proton leak. In this context, the choice of the relevant experimental model and design are key elements for the identification and quantification of mitochondrial dysfunctions.

Targeting Mitochondria 2020 Congress
October 29-30, 2020 - Virtual Congress
www.targeting-mitochondria.com

The Cell-free respiratory Competent Mitochondria in Blood: Strategic Role and Application

Mitochondria-Speakers-Alain-ThierryProf. Alain Thierry from Montpellier Cancer Research Institute, INSERM, France will join the Targeting Mitochondria 2020 Congress which will be organized virtually and give a major presentation entitled "The Cell-free respiratory Competent Mitochondria in Blood: Strategic Role and Application".

The researchers used previous findings which showed that the plasma of a healthy individual contains up to 50,000 times more mitochondrial DNA than nuclear DNA. They hypothesized that for it to be detectable and quantifiable in the blood in this manner, the mitochondrial DNA had to be protected by a structure of sufficient stability. In order to identify such a structure, plasma samples from around 100 individuals were analyzed.

This analysis revealed the presence in the blood circulation of highly stable structures containing whole mitochondrial genomes. Following examination of their size and density, as well as the integrity of their mitochondrial DNA, these structures observed using electron microscopy (up to 3.7 million per ml of plasma) were revealed to be intact and functional mitochondria.

Read the complete news here: A New Blood Component Revealed

Targeting Mitochondria 2020 Congress
October 29-30, 2020
www.targeting-mitochondria.com

Mitochondrial disease community registry (MDCR): Perspectives from patients and families, lessons learned from the data

Mitochondria-Speakers-Sophia-zilberMrs. Sophia Zilber from Boston, USA will join the Targeting Mitchondria 2020 Congress and will give a presentation entitled "Mitochondrial disease community registry (MDCR): Perspectives from patients and families, lessons learned from the data".

Patient-populated registries are an important component of rare disease communities for many reasons, including their use as a tool for gathering opinions on specific topics. The Mitochondrial Disease Community Registry (MDCR) was launched in 2014 by United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation (UMDF) for this purpose as well as to identify and characterize mitochondrial disease patients from the patient perspective. This talk presents data collected over a four year period and provided by adult mitochondrial disease patients and caregivers of pediatric mitochondrial disease patients. Findings suggest the importance of clinician-patient communication, need for treatment and cure, the impact of the disease on the entire life of a person, and quality of life as top issues as described by patients, while also highlighting that patients are hopeful and optimistic.  Additionally, data quality checks showed that more clear and simple questions and shorter more-targeted surveys are needed in order to get accurate and meaningful data for research.

 

Targeting Mitochondria 2020 Congress
October 29-30, 2020
www.targeting-mitochondria.com

Down Syndrome: Role of hydrogen sulfide overproduction in the pathogenesis of mitochondrial dysfunction

Mitochondria Speakers Csaba SzaboThe Organizing Committee of Targeting Mitochondria 2020 honored to welcome Prof. Csaba Szabo from the Université de Fribourg, Switzerland.

Prof. Szabo will give a talk entitled "Down Syndrome: Role of hydrogen sulfide overproduction in the pathogenesis of mitochondrial dysfunction" during the congress which will be held on October 29-30, 2020 in Berlin, Germany.

Summary of the talk:  Cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) is one of the key mammalian enzymes that is responsible for the biological production of the gaseous transmitter hydrogen sulfide (H2S). When H2S is overproduced, it can exert detrimental cellular effects, in part due to inhibition of mitochondrial Complex IV activity. An increased expression of CBS and the consequent overproduction of H2S is well documented in individuals with Down syndrome (DS). Two decades ago, it has been proposed that a toxic overproduction of H2S importantly contributes to the metabolic and neurological deficits associated with DS. However, until recently, this hypothesis has not yet been tested experimentally. The present talk will present recent data generated in human dermal fibroblasts showing that DS cells overproduce H2S, which, in turn, suppresses mitochondrial Complex IV activity and impairs mitochondrial oxygen consumption and ATP generation. Therapeutic CBS inhibition lifts the tonic (and reversible) suppression of Complex IV: this results in the improvement of mitochondrial function in DS cells.

 

Targeting Mitochondria 2020 Congress
October 29-30, 2020 - Berlin, Germany
www.mitochondria-site.com